Archive for March 31st, 2006

DIDYOUKNOWTHATYOUCANONLYHAVESIXTY-THREECHARACTERSINADOMAIN-NAME.com

Friday, March 31st, 2006

Here’s an interesting read containing stats on registered domains.

Posted by Jim Mathies | Filed in Technology | Comment now »

 

Desktop.com == You.os ? true : true

Friday, March 31st, 2006

Well, except that desktop.com actually looked nice. For a romp down the Web 1.0 bubble trail, check out Desktop.com Secures 29 Million, and Start-up Eyes Microsoft Crown. If you visit Desktop.com today you find the dregs of what’s left, a search toolbar from IdeaLab. Too funny.

Now check out this post by Frank Gruber on You.os, desktop.com 2.0 and enjoy a good laugh.

Posted by Jim Mathies | Filed in Software, Technology, Web 2.0 | Comment now »

 

Amazon CTO

Friday, March 31st, 2006

I like this guy. I like Scoble too but this whole corporate blogging thing seems to me to be somewhat of a fad.

I wanted them abandon their fuzzy group hug approach, and counter me with hard arguments why they were right and I was wrong. Instead they appeared shell-shocked that anyone actually had the guts to challenge the golden wonder boys of blogging and not accept their religion instantly.

He also has some interesting thoughts on systems scalability that ring true.

Is achieving good scalability possible? Absolutely, but only if we architect and engineer our systems to take scalability into account. For the systems we build we must carefully inspect along which axis we expect the system to grow, where redundancy is required, and how one should handle heterogeneity in this system, and make sure that architects are aware of which tools they can use for under which conditions, and what the common pitfalls are.

In essence, think ahead, the design of software shouldn’t be shortsighted. Throwing together prototypes that ultimately become production systems can easily lead to failure. I’ve never sat in the camp of developers who think it’s better to throw something together just to get it working now, without thinking about what your going to want to build into a system later. Good design that takes both short and long term goals into account and is willing to sacrifice some short term agility for long term stability usually results in far fewer headaches down the road and a better user experience overall.

Oh, and, to show I do listen sometimes, Dru you told me this a long long time ago and I’ve never forgotten it. :) And you know what? You were right.

Posted by Jim Mathies | Filed in Developer, RSS, Technology, Web 2.0 | Comment now »