Archive for September 21st, 2006

Loser

Thursday, September 21st, 2006

We’re aware that many Republicans are skeptical. After all, the Constitution says nothing about education, and for over two centuries states have been responsible for meeting the nation’s education needs. But in a world of fierce economic competition, we can’t afford to pretend that the current system is getting us where we need to go. Greater federal interference is not the answer — but neither is a naive commitment to “states’ rights.” A new model — standards set nationally, daily decisions made locally — strikes the best balance.

“standards set nationally” equals “greater federal interference.” As we have learned many times before, when the federal government starts setting standards, states who refuse to adopt those standard end up getting blackmailed through the threat of federal funding cut offs. Resulting in daily decisions being made at the federal level. This is a really bad idea. How about we implement a system of natural selection – a voucher system, and let the market sort out which schools exceed in their jobs and which schools don’t.

Link

Posted by Jim Mathies | Filed in Big Government, Politics | 2 Comments »

 

Mac Market Share

Thursday, September 21st, 2006

There’s an interesting but somewhat misguided article over on the switch to a mac site. They state that the market share for macs has experienced a massive increase over the last three years, representing over 6 percent of the market today. Unfortunately they fail to take into consideration the fact that the global market has expanded as well, and Macs have failed to keep pace. Granted though, Apple is selling more computers, albeit to a smaller and smaller percentage of the market. If your long on APPL, your probably in pretty good shape.

This post demonstrated that Apple’s market share is on a dramatic upswing with growth of greater than 23.5 percent each month over the past year. Apple will continue to experience market share gains for the remainder of 2006 and beyond. The future is bright for the Apple’s Macintosh and the OS X operating system. Apple has just embarked on a multi-year expansion that will see the company continue to grab market share.

For a more accurate look at Apple global market share, which has been fluctuating between 2.0% and 2.5% over the last few years, visit the Mac vs. PC Shootout site.

Posted by Jim Mathies | Filed in Technology | Comment now »

 

Voter ID

Thursday, September 21st, 2006

The ruling allows thousands of Georgians who do not have government-issued identification, such as driver’s licenses and passports, to vote in the Nov. 8 municipal elections without obtaining a special digital identification card, which costs $20 for five years. In prior elections, Georgians could use any one of 17 types of identification that show the person’s name and address, including a driver’s license, utility bill, bank statement or a paycheck, to gain access to a voting booth.

Two weeks ago I was sitting at a bar having a good conversation with some friends regarding Iraq. One of the people there was a citizen of the Netherlands. He voted in our last election.

I agree with the above Washington Post article – Georgia should not be charging for their voter ID cards, this easily passes as a “poll tax” and in as much, is unconstitutional thanks to the 24th Amendment. But I would challenge those who feel requiring proof of citizenship to vote is a violation of the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection clause. That clause reads:

All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

The problem is in making these IDs accessible to all. Somehow I don’t think thats going to happen. Simply doing the required checks when the person comes to vote is an option but I doubt we have the technology or a citizen database to accomplish this. We could also convert voter registration cards into photo ID cards, which might be the best answer. I honestly don’t know how to solve the problem but what I do know is that there are people out there who are not citizens voting in our elections. Until somebody can solve the problem without disadvantaging some, we’ll simply have to live with it.

Interestingly enough, there’s a bill threading it’s way through Congress which would require presenting a photo ID before being allowed to vote. Seeing as how non-citizens can get drivers licenses I don’t see how this solves anything. Here’s the text of that bill.

Posted by Jim Mathies | Filed in Constitutional Law, Immigration, Politics | Comment now »